gluten free sourdough bread loaf GF

How to Make Gluten Free Sourdough Bread with Recipe

Share

How to Make Gluten-Free Sourdough Bread with Recipe

Today I share with you my recipe to make your own gluten-free sourdough bread.

“Is sourdough actually gluten free?” Traditionally made sourdough is not gluten free.

loaf of GF sourdough bread in cast iron dutch oven

Although traditionally fermented sourdough bread

is easier to digest because of the gut-friendly bacteria, yeasts, and enzymes, it often still contains gluten. Making it unsafe if you or a loved one has Celiac Disease.

That’s where our story starts. When my second oldest daughter was 2, I knew something wasn’t right. My aunt has Celiac Disease and I had heard her experiences as a child. The descriptions sounded just like R. After a false negative, it was another 3 years before I got a doctor to listen to my mama gut that something was wrong. We did lots of tests and the diagnosis came back as positive this time, as did the biopsy results.

I had been making sourdough bread before this but stopped after this. The transition to strictly gluten-free was already going to be tough, without the delicious smell of home-baked bread wafting through the air.

Thankfully a friend shared some starter and this recipe a few years ago. So fresh-baked bread can still happen in our home!

GF sourdough starter

Where to Get Gluten Free Sourdough Starter

Obviously having a gluten-free starter is the key ingredient, but it isn’t always easy to come by. There are some sellers of it online or Etsy that you could order some from. I am trying to figure out the logistics of selling my own down the road.

If you do order it online, it will most likely come dehydrated. It will probably arrive with their directions of how to activate it. But if you need some extra help or want to see how I have rehydrated some of mine I have given friends, you can find it here.

Another way to get some starter is by starting one yourself. Lisa from Farmhouse on Boone has a tutorial of starting one here.

I have had a few friends try to make their own from various recipes, and I will just warn you that it can be tricky. You have to follow the steps carefully and be patient.

This post contains affiliate links, which means I make a small commission at no extra cost to you.

Equipment Suggested to Create GF Sourdough Bread at Home

  • Digital scale: This one is really a must for GF baking as ingredients can vary so much. But if not possible, I will include a version of the recipe that uses standard measuring sizes.
  • Glass or ceramic bowl: I use the biggest one from this set. Metal can negatively react with the dough causing it to not rise well.
  • Banneton Basket: Optional but recommended in the long term. I have a kit like this.
  • Dutch Oven: Personally I think a dutch oven gives the best crust. I have used a regular loaf pan and had good results. But the crust can get fairly tough without a cover to help trap the steam.
  • Dough Scraper: plastic is best, once again because of the chance of reacting with the dough. This comes in handy when scraping the counter or your hands when kneading the dough. It will get sticky. One is included in the Banneton Basket kit.
Gluten free sourdough bread loaf on napkin

Gluten Free Sourdough Bread Recipe

Ingredients

460 g  King Arthur’s GF flour or 3 3/4 cups

20 g psyllium husk or 2 Tablespoons + 2 tsp

9 g sea salt or 1 Tablespoon

Mix the dry ingredients listed above, together

90 g recently feed gluten-free sourdough starter or a little less than 1/3 cup (See note about timing below.)

575 grams purified water or 20 oz

Directions

  1. Mix together with a wooden spoon till it is loosely combined. (Any utensil that is not metal will do)

2. Turn the mixture out onto a GF floured surface and knead/ work into a ball for at least 3 minutes.

3. Set in a banneton basket or medium-sized glass bowl overnight.* Covered with a light towel.

4. In the morning, it should have expanded/ risen some. It doesn’t double in size like traditional gluten-based bread but should have some spring to it.

5. If using a dutch oven: Turn out dough onto a piece of parchment paper and shape it into a ball. Let it rise for an hour.*

6. 30 minutes into the rise time, place the dutch oven into the oven and turn it on to 450 degrees to preheat.

(Alternatively if using a loaf pan, butter the bottom of a loaf pan and turn the dough out into the pan. Let it rise for an hour.* You will not be placing the pan in the oven to preheat.

7. When the oven is preheated and the dough has risen, carefully score or cut a design into the top of the loaf. (Just into the top crust, do not cut deep into the loaf.)

8. If using a dutch oven: Carefully remove the dutch oven to a heat-protected workspace. Remove the lid, (watch out for steam), carefully place both the loaf and parchment paper inside of the dutch oven. Put the lid back on and the dutch oven into the oven.

(Alternatively, if using a loaf pan, place the pan into the oven. No additional steps are necessary. Bake for 1 hour.)

9. If using a dutch oven: bake for 50 minutes covered, then carefully remove the lid for the last 10 minutes of baking time. Bake for 1 hour total.

10. Let bread rest in pan/ dutch oven for 10 minutes and then remove loaf to a cooling rack.

11. Let it completely cool before cutting into it to let the “crumb” set. But I also won’t blame you if you can’t help it. Enjoy!

loaf of bread on countertop

Tips for a Successful Loaf of Gluten Free Sourdough Bread

I have had the best results using King Arthur’s gluten-free flour mix. It is widely available and has a good price per ounce on Amazon.

Only use purified water. I am on city water that has chlorine added, so we have a Berkey water filtration system. Before we had that though, I would buy gallons of purified water at the grocery store. Chlorine kills microbes. (Another reason to not drink it.)

Proof your dough in a medium-sized bowl. If it is too small, it will overflow. Too large and it will fall flat. I feel like I’m writing the story of Goldilocks, but the medium size is just right for this recipe.

Invest in a kitchen scale. Gf baking works best with a scale and your results will be more consistent if you use one.

Psyllium husk gives this gluten-free sourdough some chew but also helps it be vegan friendly. I get mine here. You want the whole husk, not psyllium husk powder.

Bake for the full amount of time. The internal temperature should be at least 210 degrees Fahrenheit.

Let the bread cool COMPLETELY before slicing it. I know this is going to take some willpower. I’ll admit, I’m not always successful in temptation. But keeping all the inner heat inside to slowly cool down will give you the best results and a happy “crumb”. (A term referring to the inside texture.)

It will be slightly gummy or squishy because of the nature of GF flours as well as the psyllium husk.

I like it best toasted.

loaf of GF sourdough

Notes about Timing

I plan to bake my loaf of bread first thing in the morning. But in order to do that, some steps need to occur ahead of time and it looks like this.

Usually, the night before I plan on baking, I feed my Gluten-Free sourdough starter around dinner time. (6 pm for me.)

Then around 9 pm, I mix the dough together, following directions 1-3.

In the morning I move on to the rest of the steps 4-10 so that by lunchtime it has had time to cool and we can eat it.

The learning process can take some getting used to but it is worth it for me to incorporate this into our home. I love to nourish my family in this grounding ritual and process.

Trouble Shooting

The texture will be sticky when mixing it. It’s just the nature of GF flours and adding the Psyllium husk adds to that. But there are some things to try if you find it is not at all workable.

Make sure to be using King Arthur’s Gluten-Free Flour

Things to try:

If it is too sticky:

  • Add a little more GF flour at a time till it gets manageable.
  • A digital scale is highly recommended. If using dry masurement cups and liquid measurement glasses, ingredients may need to be adjusted for the right consistency.
  • When using a digital scale, make sure you are measuring in grams.

If it is too hard: Your oven may be too hot.

  • Every oven is different. Try decreasing the temperature to 425 degrees, but don’t adjust the bake time too much. This could result in an unbaked center.

If it is soupy:

  • Adjust the amount of water. Next time have the full amount of water ready, but add a little at a time while you stir the ingredients together. You want the consistancy to be evenly moist without too much liquid.
Gluten free sourdough bread loaf on napkin

Gluten Free Sourdough Bread

Create a tasty loaf of sourdough bread at home that even people with Celiac Disease can enjoy.
5 from 2 votes
Prep Time 1 hr
Cook Time 1 hr
Course Side Dish
Cuisine American
Servings 10 slices
Calories 70 kcal

Equipment

  • Digital scale
  • Glass or ceramic bowl
  • Banneton basket: Optional but recommended in the long term.
  • Dutch Oven
  • Parchment Paper if using a dutch oven
  • Dough Scraper
  • Scoring Blade or sharp knife
  • Cooling Rack

Ingredients
  

  • 460 grams King Arthur's GF flour or 3 3/4 cups
  • 20 grams Psyllium husk or 2 Tablspoons + 2 tsp
  • 9 grams Sea salt or 1 Tblspoon
  • 90 grams Recently feed gluten free sourdough starter  or a little less than 1/3 cup
  • 575 grams Purified water  or 20 oz

Instructions
 

  • In a large glass bowl, mix together the GF flour, psyllium husk and sea salt.
  • Add in the wet ingredients of the GF sourdough starter and water
  • Mix together with a wooden spoon till it is loosely combined. (Any utensil that is not metal will do)
  • Turn the mixture out on to a GF floured surface and knead/ work in to a ball for at least 3 minutes.
  • Set in a banneton basket or medium sized glass bowl overnight.* Covered with a light towel.
  • In the morning, it should have expanded/ risen some. It doesn't double in size like traditional gluten based breads but should have some spring to it.
  • If using a dutch oven: Turn out dough on to a piece of parchment paper and shape it in to a ball. Let it rise for an hour.*
  • 30 minutes in to the rise time, place the dutch oven into the oven and turn it on to 450 degrees to preheat.
  • (Alternatively if using a loaf pan, butter the bottom of a loaf pan and turn dough out in to the pan. Let it rise for an hour.*)
  • When the oven is preheated and the dough has risen, carefully score or cut a design in to the top of the loaf. (Just in to the top crust, do not cut deep in to the loaf.)
  • If using a dutch oven: Carefully remove the dutch oven to a heat-protected workspace. Remove the lid, (watch out for steam), carefully place both the loaf and parchment paper inside of the dutch oven. Put the lid back on and the dutch oven into the oven.
  • (Alternatively, if using a loaf pan, place the pan in to the oven. No additional steps necessary. Bake for 1 hour.)
  • If using a dutch oven: bake for 50 minutes covered, then carefully remove the lid for the last 10 minutes of baking time. Bake for 1 hour total.
  • Let bread rest in pan/ dutch oven for 10 minutes and then remove loaf to a cooling rack.
  • Let it completly cool before cutting in to it to let the "crumb" set. But I also won't blame you if you can't help it.

Notes

*Rise times can vary depending on the warmth of your kitchen. I find that times need to be adjusted according to the seasons.
My kitchen is cooler in winter, meaning things will take longer to achieve the same rise that will happen quickly in summer.
In summer be careful to not “overproof” your bread as it will fall during baking. 

Tips for a successful loaf of Gluten-Free Sourdough Bread

When mixing/ kneading, it can be very sticky. Refer back to the post under “Trouble Shooting” for help.
I have had the best results using King Arthur’s gluten-free flour mix. It is widely available and has a good price per ounce. 
Proof your dough in a medium-sized bowl. If it is too small, it will overflow. Too large and it will fall flat. I feel like I’m writing the story of Goldilocks, but the medium size is just right for this recipe. 
Invest in a kitchen scale. Gf baking works best with a scale and your results will be more consistent if you use one. 
Psyllium husk gives this gluten-free sourdough some chew but also helps it be vegan friendly. 
Bake for the full amount of time. The internal temperature should be at least 210 degrees Fahrenheit. 
Let the bread cool COMPLETELY before slicing it. I know this is going to take some willpower. I’ll admit, I’m not always successful in this temptation. But keeping all the inner heat inside to slowly cool down will give you the best results and a happy “crumb”. (A term referring to the inside texture.)
It will be slightly gummy or squishy because of the nature of GF flours as well as the psyllium husk. 
I like it best toasted.

 

Keyword gluten free, sourdough, sourdough starter
Gluten-Free Sourdough bread recipe

Share

12 Comments

  • Allie April 29, 2021 at 4:27 pm

    5 stars
    Such a great recipe. It’s so nice to find a great gluten free bread recipe.

    Reply
    • Joanna April 29, 2021 at 9:10 pm

      Thank you! Gluten free can be tricky but I enjoy it. 🙂

      Reply
  • Ada April 29, 2021 at 5:03 pm

    5 stars
    This looks really good! I started to go gluten-free. I will try this recipe. Thank you!!! 🙂

    Reply
    • Joanna April 29, 2021 at 9:10 pm

      I’m so glad you think so! Let me know how it goes. 🙂

      Reply
  • Gladys April 29, 2021 at 6:16 pm

    This sourdough bread look amazing! I will have to give it a try. Thanks for sharing!!

    Reply
    • Joanna April 29, 2021 at 9:11 pm

      You’re so kind! Thanks for stopping by.

      Reply
  • Leslie April 29, 2021 at 7:06 pm

    Your bread looks so pretty and tasty!

    Reply
    • Joanna April 29, 2021 at 9:11 pm

      Thanks so much!

      Reply
  • Alicia F May 28, 2021 at 7:17 pm

    Hi friend! Thanks for the recipe! How do you make your bread have that beautiful design on top!?

    Reply
    • Joanna May 30, 2021 at 9:06 pm

      Hi back! I use a blade or knife to make designs just before popping it in the oven. 🙂

      Reply
  • Mikayla August 12, 2021 at 2:17 pm

    Hello, I followed the directions but when it came time to knead it was way too sticky. What could’ve went wrong ?
    Thank you!

    Reply
    • Joanna August 13, 2021 at 8:03 am

      It for sure will have a sticky texture and can be a bit of work to knead. You can add more GF flour to get a texture that is more workable but if you did that and it still was unworkable, it may be a difference in some of the ingredients. What Gf flour are you using? Do you have a kitchen scale or using the measurement guidelines? I’d love to help make it work for you!

      Reply

Leave a Comment

Recipe Rating